Policing Abstracts
“Why Reforms Fail.” Policing & Society, 18 (No. 1, March), 2008, 25-37.
  Police reform is risky and hard, and efforts to innovate in policing often fall
short of expectations. This chapter examines sources of resistance to change
in in policing. Some are internal, including opposition to reform at virtually all in
policing. Some are internal, including opposition to reform at virtually all vis
change is highly variable, particularly if proposals do not threaten working
levels of the organization and among special units. The position of unions vis-a-
vis change is highly variable, particularly if proposals do not threaten working
change lurk in the vicinity of policing, and reformers need to bring them into the
conditions and officer safety. Politicians and other potential opponents of
process as well. The public must understand how the investment they have in
policing will be enhanced, and not threatened, by reform. If new strategies
require the cooperation of other service agencies (as, for example, for problem-
solving policing) the heads of those bureaucracies must understand they are
partners in their city’s program, not victims of empire building by the police. At
executives to change, if reforms are to survive leadership transition.the top,
city leaders must match the commitment of chiefs and other police executives
to change, if reforms are to survive leadership transition.
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